Posts Tagged ‘Oil Painting’

Mannaheim Progressive Pro-Choice Clinic

December 7, 2016
Women's Medical Centre with earliest motor vehicle by Karl Benz, © 2021 by Torsten Slama and the International Pro-Brick Society

Woman’s Medical Centre with 1886 Benz Patent Motorcar (Oils on canvas on wood, 50,3 x 62,8cm)

Photographic reproduction of a painting which is positioned  somewhere on the borderline demarcating the difference between the entirely satisfactory with added interest, and one of the lesser efforts in the field of true painting. Due to experiments with the preparation and priming of the canvas, the behavior of the paint was unexpected. Thus the ebetweenxecution lacks fluency. The technically inferior quality of the photographic reproduction adds to the impression of a very strange atmosphere permeating the picture, ambiguously oscillating between  moodiness and Objectivism. The symbolism; moon, spiral, car, and brick, is rather balanced, but with the addition of some sea shells, it is clearly shifted into the realm of female reproduction. (Of course, this is based on highly untrustworthy  assessments of gender-classification of objects. Ed.)

The building does, or at least did, actually exist, somewhere on the British Islands. The photocopy of a photograph of the building from a book on Brutalist architecture garnered at the Düsseldorf Central Library some 25 years ago exists, yet, due to negligence, lacks any inscription for further contextual elucidation of the source. So neither information on the architect nor the actual location of this interestingly proportioned edifice can be provided, much to this author’s disgust.

This painting is based on that drawing. Drawing is finer, possibly more accomplished. Yet the painting adds something. Mostly it adds the je-ne-sais-quoi. Painting and explanatory note © 2021 by Torsten Slama and the International Pro-Brick Society IPB

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House for Quasi Phantom Regions

November 28, 2016
Country House with Hip Roof B8090 by Torsten Slama 2016

Country House with Hip Roof B 8090
(Oils on canvas on wood, 50,3 x 62,8cm)

This house is for the lover of open country, but with no need for the flora and fauna usually associated with it. It is a house for the Frommian necrophiliac. This country lies on the surface of a planet roughly the size of Earth, but much heavier and with a very thick, almost water-like foggy atmosphere. Consequently the ground resembles the deep sea floor on Earth. A hint of some form of vegetation, either aquatic or coniferous can be surmised or easily dismissed in the milky background. Tastefully arranged on the premises are one replicated Silurian nautilus shell, various simplified crystal sculptures made of polymethylmethacrylate coated with transparent SiO2 thin films in hues of yellow, pink, and green, and several geometric primitives of synthetic plaster. The house itself is the sparsely ornamented, simplified version of a terranean postmodern country house catering for the aspiring single person or couple in the lower medium affluent income range and has the catalog number B 8090. It is especially suited for the writer of semi-popular fantasy novels. Note that it comes without garage, as such is not necessary on a planet without any destinations to travel to. The windows, though ostensibly made of some glass-like material, are either covered from the inside with blue boards, or the whole house might be filled with some blue tinted medium or nutritive solution. The inside of the house might be dark, artificially illuminated, or not existing. The owner or owners of the house might be immaterial, but still in need of spiritual nourishment, provided by the large space crystal floating in the dense, soup-like sky. This atmospheric painting © 2021 by Torsten Slama and the Fantasy Society

Natural Gas Generator for the Eurasian Market

November 9, 2015
Natural Gas Generator painted by Torsten Slama

Waukescha Natural Gas Generator for the Eastern European Region and Asia (45x34cm, oil, spirulina, and glitter pigments on canvas mounted on wood)

This painting, as subtly alluring in its pallette as in the choice of special and unusual pigments, cannot be adequately represented in photography (even when captured with a sensor especially suited to register finest colour nuances without sacrificing exactitude and focus). In fact, even the human eye is a sensor too coarse and surface-bound to understand that painting in this case is not only the coating or covering of a surface with paints of appropriate consistency and opacitiy in a way which concentrates too much on the where and too little on the when, but the loving and time consuming application of a multitude of layers of different degrees of opaqueness or transparency. The ultimate goal is not recognizable or symbolic representation, but the creation of an image with depth, in which even the first insecure tracings and irregular activities of a tentative and searching brush are still detectable under a potentially limitless number of successively applied layers, each adding its own share of happy accidents. The resulting depth is never a strictly two-dimensional and optical phenomenon. The true painting of value always has unique and custom made surface characteristics. The author of this painting is indebted to the teachings of the late Bob Ross, but chose to go the way of stretching production time instead of compressing it. By doing so, he could circumvent the adverse effects of a rushed production, namely that the perceived overall quality of the product suffers under a glance more scrutinizing and resting than fleeting and cursory. This painting is intended to satisfy on the happy accident level as well as on the level of more method-result based western observation systems striving for overall recognizability, structure, and order.

More content related thoughts about the desirability of finding interdependent grid solutions for the application of small unit solutions to medium scale energy requirements over unified and in most regards more hazardous, if theoretically and practically more efficient, large scale energy production solutions, will not be amplified upon here. This space is dedicated to the discussion of technical merits of the painting, not of the depicted object and the ideas it represents.Atmospheric rendering © 2021 by Torsten Slama and the International Interdependent Energy Grid Board

La Machine femelle / Le Reste parfait

December 25, 2013
La Machine femelle - The Female Machine

La Machine femelle / The Female Machine
(Oil on canvas mounted on wood, 50×27 cm, 2013)

Note that the positioning of these two paintings in one textual context created certain problems for the author, which are reflected in the result.

The clever kind of autoportrait below is a sort of companion piece to the inter-dependent partner painting above, but sold separately…

The Perfect Rest - Le Reste parfait

Le Reste parfait / The Perfect Rest
(Oil on canvas mounted on wood, 43×30 cm, 2013)

In actuality, the top painting is wider, but not as high as the other painting. The second billed painting was painted first. The Female Machine was painted second. The titles are fairly sexist. The phallic machine is resting, exhausted from phallic magic-making, the female machine seems more sturdy and busy, which overall has much to do with world wide reality. Both paintings are fairly small. They are currently, nicely framed, on display at an undisclosed third-party-location in a city by a lake.

© 301.2 by The Instrumentalists, Torsten Slama Historical Society

Multi-Purpose Worship Centre “Sindelfingen”

January 8, 2013
Multi Purpose Centre "Sindelfingen", 2012, Oil on canvas, 40,3 x 53,3 cm © 2021 by Torsten Slama and The Illusionist Society

Multi Purpose Centre “Sindelfingen”, 2012, Oil on canvas, 40,3 x 53,3 cm

This former motor hotel was acquired at an undisclosed date by the Illusionist Society Sindelfingen and converted into a multi purpose and worship centre. All kinds of gatherings are taking place here, suitable for all age-groups and with a clear anti-violence bias. All community gatherings are thus designed to be completely pressure free, allowing all kinds of individual expression, from introvert brooding to carefree dancing. The only commandment to be followed is that of interdependability, that is, everything is done with the fellow creature in mind. Animals and plants are always included in the gatherings, preferably in their actual form, or at least in effigy. It follows automatically that whatever is taking place in this centre is always in accordance with known Tellurian principles. The centre therefore forms a spiritually viable alternative to the city church. The layout is strictly Tellurian: the horizontal plane is for togetherness, the vertical form for compartmentalized administration and individual accommodation purposes. Two crystal shaped monitor probes made from space-age UltraQuartz™ sheets are homeostatically designed to use solar irradiation for buoyancy.Painting and explanatory note © 2021 by Torsten Slama and The Illusionist Society/Hekate Sibonga (Dir.)

House “Djibi” for the Friend of all Animals

February 9, 2012
House "Djibi", painting by Torsten Slama, only authorized photographic reproduction

House “Djibi” for the Friend of all Animals. (Oil on canvas-covered panel w/ aluminium coated ornamental frame, 40×53 cm)

House “Djibi” is named after the cat-novel by Felix Salten. Some cats, a dog, and other animals are living and dying and killing each other in the house of an elderly school teacher and his wife. The teacher is grappling with a mild identity crisis, being undecided whether he is too soft of heart, and wishing himself to be stern and unrelenting, before deciding that he is, indeed, a soft sort of man.

Before being assigned its final title, the painting had a working title referring to August Derleth’s house-centered novel “The Lurker at the Threshold”.

The painting tries to look rather encrusted as opposed to smooth. The clouds are trying to look like clouds painted by Walter Leistikow. Flake White Hue and Transparent White were heavily used. Some areas do look like details from Cuthbert Hamilton Ellis’ paintings: rough and unfinished impasto effects prevail in an otherwhise naturalistic but unacademic style.

This is the photographic reproduction authorized by the painter. There exists another photograph of this painting, discernible by ghastly colours and flat lighting, made by a careless professional with a good camera. True appreciation for a given subject in many cases is much better than indifferent technique and superior technology.

See also these verses from “Sophia Trenton: A Moral Poem” (Phi Beta Cappa Poem at Stanford University, June 19, 1920) by Leonard Bacon, as quoted in Donald Knuth’s “The TeXBook”:

Technique! The very word is like the shriek
Of outraged Art. It is the idiot name
Given to eff ort by those who are too weak,
Too weary, or too dull to play the game.

© 2017 Torsten Slama and International Publications Organisation World Wide