Archive for the ‘Painting’ Category

Mannaheim Progressive Pro-Choice Clinic

December 7, 2016
Women's Medical Centre with earliest motor vehicle by Karl Benz, © 2021 by Torsten Slama and the International Pro-Brick Society

Woman’s Medical Centre with 1886 Benz Patent Motorcar (Oils on canvas on wood, 50,3 x 62,8cm)

Photographic reproduction of a painting which is positioned  somewhere on the borderline demarcating the difference between the entirely satisfactory with added interest, and one of the lesser efforts in the field of true painting. Due to experiments with the preparation and priming of the canvas, the behavior of the paint was unexpected. Thus the ebetweenxecution lacks fluency. The technically inferior quality of the photographic reproduction adds to the impression of a very strange atmosphere permeating the picture, ambiguously oscillating between  moodiness and Objectivism. The symbolism; moon, spiral, car, and brick, is rather balanced, but with the addition of some sea shells, it is clearly shifted into the realm of female reproduction. (Of course, this is based on highly untrustworthy  assessments of gender-classification of objects. Ed.)

The building does, or at least did, actually exist, somewhere on the British Islands. The photocopy of a photograph of the building from a book on Brutalist architecture garnered at the Düsseldorf Central Library some 25 years ago exists, yet, due to negligence, lacks any inscription for further contextual elucidation of the source. So neither information on the architect nor the actual location of this interestingly proportioned edifice can be provided, much to this author’s disgust.

This painting is based on that drawing. Drawing is finer, possibly more accomplished. Yet the painting adds something. Mostly it adds the je-ne-sais-quoi. Painting and explanatory note © 2021 by Torsten Slama and th International Pro-Brick Society IPB

House for Quasi Phantom Regions

November 28, 2016
Country House with Hip Roof B8090 by Torsten Slama 2016

Country House with Hip Roof B 8090
(Oils on canvas on wood, 50,3 x 62,8cm)

This house is for the lover of open country, but with no need for the flora and fauna usually associated with it. It is a house for the Frommian necrophiliac. This country lies on the surface of a planet roughly the size of Earth, but much heavier and with a very thick, almost water-like foggy atmosphere. Consequently the ground resembles the deep sea floor on Earth. A hint of some form of vegetation, either aquatic or coniferous can be surmised or easily dismissed in the milky background. Tastefully arranged on the premises are one replicated Silurian nautilus shell, various simplified crystal sculptures made of polymethylmethacrylate coated with transparent SiO2 thin films in hues of yellow, pink, and green, and several geometric primitives of synthetic plaster. The house itself is the sparsely ornamented, simplified version of a terranean postmodern country house catering for the aspiring single person or couple in the lower medium affluent income range and has the catalog number B 8090. It is especially suited for the writer of semi-popular fantasy novels. Note that it comes without garage, as such is not necessary on a planet without any destinations to travel to. The windows, though ostensibly made of some glass-like material, are either covered from the inside with blue boards, or the whole house might be filled with some blue tinted medium or nutritive solution. The inside of the house might be dark, artificially illuminated, or not existing. The owner or owners of the house might be immaterial, but still in need of spiritual nourishment, provided by the large space crystal floating in the dense, soup-like sky. This atmospheric painting © 2021 by Torsten Slama and the Fantasy Society

Exhibition for Sorcerers and Sodomites

July 8, 2014
Exhibition announcement in the style of Knaur's Lexikon der alten Malerei

Exhibition Announcement and commemorative postcard (“hand-lettered”, in the style of “Knaurs Lexikon der alten Malerei”)

The following is an explanatory note, illuminating the origin of the exhibition’s title in connection with the shown exhibits, which are drawings and paintings of machines, mainly reciprocating engines, belonging to the group of heat engines.

“Und ob ich gleich keine Übeltat beging, dadurch ich das Leben verwirkt hätte, so war ich jedoch so ruchlos, daß man (außer den Zauberern und Sodomiten) kaum einen wüstern Menschen antreffen mögen.”

“And though I did no deed evil enough to forfeit my life, yet was I so reckless that, save for sorcerers and sodomites, no worse man could be found.”

Hans Jakob Christoph von Grimmelshausen. Der abenteuerliche Simplicissimus Teutsch (The Adventurous Simplicissimus). Book III, Chapter XI

Sodomites* commit the sexual act as a simple in-out, analogous to the movement of the piston in a reciprocating engine. The linear motion of in-out is historically a male model of dynamics. (Reciprocating engines then convert this linear motion into a circular motion, which is commonly constructed as a female kind of motion.)

Sorcerers believe they can get things done by other means than with their own hands, so they use magic, or magical machines.

Both these aspects make machines so ubiquitous and so powerful: their movements are restricted, free of emotion, and their productivity is in magical ways surpassing the natural human productivity. Incidentally, the machine also is commonly interpreted as a monument to western, masculine civilization.

*even though the term is now used to describe a wide variety of non-procreational sexual activities, it was originally far more clearly defined and solely used for people engaging in anal sex.The term and its interpretations can be used as a very instructive example for discussions of the social construction of deviancy, yet this is not the issue here.

 

La Machine femelle / Le Reste parfait

December 25, 2013
La Machine femelle - The Female Machine

La Machine femelle / The Female Machine
(Oil on canvas mounted on wood, 50×27 cm, 2013)

Note that the positioning of these two paintings in one textual context created certain problems for the author, which are reflected in the result.

The clever kind of autoportrait below is a sort of companion piece to the inter-dependent partner painting above, but sold separately…

The Perfect Rest - Le Reste parfait

Le Reste parfait / The Perfect Rest
(Oil on canvas mounted on wood, 43×30 cm, 2013)

In actuality, the top painting is wider, but not as high as the other painting. The second billed painting was painted first. The Female Machine was painted second. The titles are fairly sexist. The phallic machine is resting, exhausted from phallic magic-making, the female machine seems more sturdy and busy, which overall has much to do with world wide reality. Both paintings are fairly small. They are currently, nicely framed, on display at an undisclosed third-party-location in a city by a lake.

© 301.2 by The Instrumentalists, Torsten Slama Historical Society

Multi-Purpose Worship Centre “Sindelfingen”

January 8, 2013
Multi Purpose Centre "Sindelfingen", 2012, Oil on canvas, 40,3 x 53,3 cm © 2021 by Torsten Slama and The Illusionist Society

Multi Purpose Centre “Sindelfingen”, 2012, Oil on canvas, 40,3 x 53,3 cm

This former motor hotel was acquired at an undisclosed date by the Illusionist Society Sindelfingen and converted into a multi purpose and worship centre. All kinds of gatherings are taking place here, suitable for all age-groups and with a clear anti-violence bias. All community gatherings are thus designed to be completely pressure free, allowing all kinds of individual expression, from introvert brooding to carefree dancing. The only commandment to be followed is that of interdependability, that is, everything is done with the fellow creature in mind. Animals and plants are always included in the gatherings, preferably in their actual form, or at least in effigy. It follows automatically that whatever is taking place in this centre is always in accordance with known Tellurian principles. The centre therefore forms a spiritually viable alternative to the city church. The layout is strictly Tellurian: the horizontal plane is for togetherness, the vertical form for compartmentalized administration and individual accommodation purposes. Two crystal shaped monitor probes made from space-age UltraQuartz™ sheets are homeostatically designed to use solar irradiation for buoyancy.Painting and explanatory note © 2021 by Torsten Slama and The Illusionist Society/Hekate Sibonga (Dir.)

House “Djibi” for the Friend of all Animals

February 9, 2012
House "Djibi", painting by Torsten Slama, only authorized photographic reproduction

House “Djibi” for the Friend of all Animals. (Oil on canvas-covered panel w/ aluminium coated ornamental frame, 40×53 cm)

House “Djibi” is named after the cat-novel by Felix Salten. Some cats, a dog, and other animals are living and dying and killing each other in the house of an elderly school teacher and his wife. The teacher is grappling with a mild identity crisis, being undecided whether he is too soft of heart, and wishing himself to be stern and unrelenting, before deciding that he is, indeed, a soft sort of man.

Before being assigned its final title, the painting had a working title referring to August Derleth’s house-centered novel “The Lurker at the Threshold”.

The painting tries to look rather encrusted as opposed to smooth. The clouds are trying to look like clouds painted by Walter Leistikow. Flake White Hue and Transparent White were heavily used. Some areas do look like details from Cuthbert Hamilton Ellis’ paintings: rough and unfinished impasto effects prevail in an otherwhise naturalistic but unacademic style.

This is the photographic reproduction authorized by the painter. There exists another photograph of this painting, discernible by ghastly colours and flat lighting, made by a careless professional with a good camera. True appreciation for a given subject in many cases is much better than indifferent technique and superior technology.

See also these verses from “Sophia Trenton: A Moral Poem” (Phi Beta Cappa Poem at Stanford University, June 19, 1920) by Leonard Bacon, as quoted in Donald Knuth’s “The TeXBook”:

Technique! The very word is like the shriek
Of outraged Art. It is the idiot name
Given to eff ort by those who are too weak,
Too weary, or too dull to play the game.

© 2017 Torsten Slama and International Publications Organisation World Wide

HBATEC Meat Factory (Oorth)

August 26, 2010

HBATEC Meat Factory (Oorth)

A pictorial representation of a more modern meat factory on a planet in the Oorth Cloud. The dark sand surface of this planet turns it into a very efficient accumulator of the orgone-type energy its star emanates. The whole planet thus turns into a giant SAPA-bion breeder. The SAPA-bions are retrieved by means of special underground attractor devices and used as the raw material for meat generation. This factory is a gigantic scale recreation of its smaller sister plant, the original HBATEC Meat Factory, a former secret missile silo in Uurd. It will soon make this much smaller plant, which produces comparatively impure meat, obsolete, and is able to produce healthy, anti-cancerogenic, and highly nutritious synthetic meat for entire galaxies. This design © 2017 Torsten Slama and International Publications Organisation World Wide

Cooperative Raiffeisen Institute "Wilhelm Reich"

October 21, 2009
Cooperative Institute "Wilhelm Reich", Oil on Canvas, 90x170cm, Torsten Slama, 2008

Cooperative Institute “Wilhelm Reich”, Oil on Canvas, 90x170cm, 2008

This cooperative institute of the Raiffeisen-type serves as a trading post, information exchange place, and a general department-store-type administrative center for settlers on thinly populated planets or asteroids. It can replace an entire economy as a regulatory device. It functions without a currency, without money, without any unit of economical accumulation. Thus, it ensures the well-being of all without the creation of unnecessary boundaries between haves and have-nots. Raiffeisen-type cooperative institutes effectuate a loosening of all economical muscles in a planetary society, and so this particular institute, located on the planet Oog-Ronn, is logically dedicated to Wilhelm Reich, who invented the vegetotherapeutic procedures for loosening the muscles in a human organism.

This institute, like many other institutes of its kind on similarly far-off planets without natural satellites, harbours a school for the Boibel-Loth alphabet, to propagate lunar knowledge also on moonless planets.   (c) 2017 by Torsten Slama

Hydra Hydration Plant

April 17, 2009

HYDRA Hydration Plant with Ascending Surveillance Drone (Oil on canvas, 160x120cm)

When Germany still strived for complete autonomy and independence of Western influences, coal hydration technology was one of her attempts to realise complete energy independence. Had the hydration plants not been completely eradicated by the end of World War II, their gasoline output would have served Germany’s entire private car fleet well into the 1960’s.  The basic idea was alchemist in nature; the hydration plant would consume what the German soil offered in abundance, namely coal, and turn it into petrol, a far more combustible propellant, much better suited for modern warfare or the needs of modern society in general. One wonders how the concept could have been so completely discouraged that it never resurfaced. This experimental simplified hydration plant was codenamed “Hydra” in honour of the Lernaean Hydra of Greek mythology, an ancient nameless serpent-like chthonic water beast. This painting (c) 2017 by Torsten Slama

Holzfabrik

March 11, 2009
holzfabrikm1

Holzfabrik/Wood Factory (Oil on canvas, 124x88cm, 2008)

This experimental wood factory, code named “Thomson&Co”, is located  in northern China, 150 km east of the capital. It produces synthetic trees and constitutes a major effort, paid for in part by international trusts, in part by the Chinese government, to combat global warming.

Its future purpose: located on other planets, it will be critical in producing an artificial sustainable atmosphere. (c) 2017 by Torsten Slama